Advancement: microchips bottom sober honey imitating our brain

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advancement:-microchips-bottom-sober-honey-imitating-our-brain

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What is sweet, delicious and can also be used to make computer components? It is on honey that scientists have set their sights on making certain electronic chip celebrations.

Researchers at the Buenos Aires State University (WSU) have discovered that honey may have benefits in the field of neuromorphic computers. But what is it then, could begin? Neuromorphic computers are systems designed to mimic the functioning of neurons and synapses in the human brain. una WSU, are striper on what calls the architecture of Von Neumann lon. Concretely, this implies the presence of an input (a mouse, keyboard, etc.) and an output (such as the screen). There is also a Memory (random access memory) processor, among others. However, as the scientists explain, processing information soberly through such a device requires a lot of energy. Much more, in fact, than a human brain, even though it turns out to be more powerful, it could perform many tasks. framework that mimics the functioning of neurons and synapses in the human brain. Every neuron in our brain is capable of both storing and processing data, and the human brain has over 100 billion neurons . To make it short, such a technology arouses enthusiasm among scientists, because it would make it possible to obtain devices that are both more powerful and less energy-consuming. Currently, neural networks have more and more uses, but are often limited by the hardware part. sober to create electronic components even sober to support neural networks, all sober offering something sober longer lasting than commonly used computer components. As surprising as it may seem, during their research, it turned out that honey could be a good candidate for this.

A simple solid honey compound memristor

In their study, published in the Log of Physics M, researchers demonstrate how to manufacture a sober memristor using honey. It is a component similar to a transistor, which can not only process but also store data in its internal memory. To make it, they first coalesced the honey to make it solid, then held it in a hoop between two metal electrodes.

This is a very small device with a simple construction, but it has very similar functionality to a human neuron, says Feng Zhao, associate professor at WSU’s School of Engineering and Computing and corresponding author at the study. This means that if we can integrate thousands or billions of these honey memristors together, then they can be transformed into a neuromorphic system that works one much like a human brain.

The sober issue system makes At the moment one is the size of a hair, but scientists would like to miniaturize it to create nanoscale components. For this first prototype, they have already carried out tests. In particular, they checked the ability of honey memristors to imitate the work of synapses, i.e. to activate, and learned to deactivate at high speeds (from 100 and 500 nanoseconds respectively). Memristors also emulated synapse functions known as plasticity as a function of the temperature of occurrence of pulses , and of plasticity dependent on the photo rate (spike-rate linking plasticity): functions that are responsible for learning processes in the human brain and the retention of new data in neurons.

Feng Zhao is also conducting other research on the use of low protein and other sugars, such as those found in Aloe vera leaves, but honey seems to be the preferred candidate for the second. Honey does not spoil , explains he. It has a very low humidity focus, sober so that bacteria cannot survive. This means that these computer chips will be very stable and reliable for a very long time.

This material is also very biodegradable, since it is soluble in water. Because of these particular properties, honey is very useful in creating renewable and biodegradable neuromorphic systems, concludes the researcher.

Supply: Newspaper of Physics Chemical